2008 Guide to MRAP Vehicles, Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Armored Vehicle, Iraq War Deployment, IEDs, Joint Explosive Ordnance Disposal Rapid Response Vehicle JERRV (CD-ROM) pdf epub fb2

2008 Guide to MRAP Vehicles, Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Armored Vehicle, Iraq War Deployment, IEDs, Joint Explosive Ordnance Disposal Rapid Response Vehicle JERRV (CD-ROM) by Department of Defense pdf epub fb2

2008 Guide to MRAP Vehicles, Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Armored Vehicle, Iraq War Deployment, IEDs, Joint Explosive Ordnance Disposal Rapid Response Vehicle JERRV (CD-ROM) Author: Department of Defense
Title: 2008 Guide to MRAP Vehicles, Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Armored Vehicle, Iraq War Deployment, IEDs, Joint Explosive Ordnance Disposal Rapid Response Vehicle JERRV (CD-ROM)
ISBN: 1422014819
ISBN13: 978-1422014813
Other Formats: txt rtf doc docx
Pages: -
Publisher: Progressive Management (January 22, 2008)
Language: English
Category: No category
Size PDF version: 1738 kb
Size EPUB version: 1866 kb
Subcategory: -




This up-to-date and comprehensive electronic book on CD-ROM disc presents a vital collection of important documents, reports, and files about the new vehicle being deployed in Iraq, the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) armored vehicle. The Department of Defense (DOD) recently launched a major procurement initiative to replace all uparmored High Mobility, Multi-Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs) in Iraq with Mine-Resistant, Ambush-Protected (MRAP) vehicles by FY2009. MRAPs have been described as providing twice as much protection against Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) - responsible for about 70% of U.S. casualties in Iraq - than uparmored HMMWVs. The DOD's accelerated MRAP program raises a number of potential policy issues for congressional consideration. MRAPs are a family of vehicles produced by a variety of domestic and international companies that generally incorporate a "V"-shaped hull and armor plating designed to provide protection against mines and IEDs. The DOD intends to procure three types of MRAPs. These include Category I vehicles, weighing about 7 tons and capable of carrying 6 passengers; Category II vehicles, weighing about 19 tons and capable of carrying 10 passengers; and Category III vehicles, intended to be used primarily to clear mines and IEDs, weighing about 22.5 tons and capable of carrying up to 12 passengers. The Army and Marines have employed two versions of MRAPs (the Category III Buffalo and the Category II Cougar, respectively) in limited numbers in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2003, primarily for route clearance and explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) operations. These route clearance MRAPs quickly gained a reputation for providing superior protection for their crews, and some suggested that MRAPs might be a better alternative for transporting troops in combat than uparmored HMMWVs. The Buffalo MRAP was originally intended to be fielded only to engineer units, with the Army planning to stand up three Route Clearance Companies per year starting in FY2007, for a total of 12 companies. Marine Corps leadership reportedly decided in February 2007 to replace all uparmored HMMWVs in Iraq with MRAPs, whereas Army leadership would continue to rely on its uparmored HMMWVs. In March 2007, the MRAP requirement for all services reportedly grew by 15% as the Navy, Air Force, and the Special Operations Command (SOCOM) added requirements for MRAPs that stood at 7,774 DOD-wide as of March 26, 2007.4 In May 2007, reportedly because of the requests from Army commanders in Iraq, Army leadership reportedly began considering the possibility of replacing all uparmored HMMWVs in Iraq with MRAPs, thereby increasing the Army's total requirement to approximately 17,700 MRAP vehicles. On June 28, 2007, the Joint Requirements Oversight Council (JROC) reportedly endorsed a requirement to replace every HMMWV in with a MRAP, which could potentially push the MRAP requirement to more than 23,000 vehicles if force levels in Iraq remain relatively constant for the next few years. Given the current situation in Iraq and uncertainty about troop levels, the DOD's and the Service's MRAP requirements may fluctuate throughout the duration of the program. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates has declared that "the MRAP program should be considered the highest priority Department of Defense acquisition program." The Secretary of Defense has established the MRAP Task Force to speed production and fielding of MRAPs and has assigned the Marines to manage all MRAP procurement for DOD. The MRAP program has also been designated a "DX" program, giving it priority for resources.