Gathering the people, settling the land: The Archaeology of a Middle Thames Landscape, Anglo Saxon to post-medieval (Thames Valley Landscapes Monograph) pdf epub fb2

Gathering the people, settling the land: The Archaeology of a Middle Thames Landscape, Anglo Saxon to post-medieval (Thames Valley Landscapes Monograph) by Stuart Foreman, Jonathan Hiller, D. Petts pdf epub fb2

Gathering the people, settling the land: The Archaeology of a Middle Thames Landscape, Anglo Saxon to post-medieval (Thames Valley Landscapes Monograph) Author: Stuart Foreman, Jonathan Hiller, D. Petts
Title: Gathering the people, settling the land: The Archaeology of a Middle Thames Landscape, Anglo Saxon to post-medieval (Thames Valley Landscapes Monograph)
ISBN: 0904220311
ISBN13: 978-0904220315
Other Formats: mbr rtf txt azw
Pages: 126 pages
Publisher: Oxford University School of Archaeology (September 1, 2002)
Language: English
Category: History
Size PDF version: 1675 kb
Size EPUB version: 1852 kb
Subcategory: Europe




Why did people gather at the site of a long abandoned Roman farmstead not far from the river Thames sometime around the year AD 760; what was their purpose and where did they come from? The middle Thames valley in the Saxon and early medieval period defies easy explanation. While archaeological discoveries and historical research have illuminated our understanding of the upper Thames to the west and London and the estuary to the east, the nature of settlement between has remained elusive and obscure. With no apparent evidence of any major Saxon or early medieval settlement focus, how did this area relate to the important sites at Taplow and Windsor? Was it merely uninhabited pastureland? Given the political importance of the Thames as a border between Mercia and Wessex through much of the Saxon period, was this an area in dispute, and if so, is this reflected in the remains (or lack of them) to be found? The excavations by Oxford Archaeology on the sites of the Environment Agency's Maidenhead, Windsor and Eton Flood Alleviation Scheme and the Eton College Rowing Course have produced an exceptional site of Anglo-Saxon date, suggesting occupation and activity unlike that from any existing 'type site'. Its unique nature is perhaps best seen as a product of the role that the middle Thames valley played, as both axis and boundary, in the middle Saxon period. The excavations have also shed light on the medieval settlement pattern. This is a full colour synthetic report on the excavations, and includes a CD with interactive features.